Be Critical and Ask for Evidence

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The last two posts have looked at changing our perspectives about the formal things we do in organizations and the expectations we have about our interactions. Changing our perspective tends to be an internal and reflective process. This post is about taking those perspectives and making them more visible. More visible when confronted with OUCH! producing activities. It is about saying things are full of shit (as noted in the last post) but through gestures that may produce responses that keep things moving forward!

There an awful lot of OUCH! producing activities built into our organizations and thrust upon us by so called ‘experts’. Due to this I think it is best to adopt a critical perspective about most mainstream and formal things that happen in organizations. This way you are constantly looking for the subtleties that so easily can slip by us and end up creating OUCH!. This doesn’t mean you have to be always negative or resistant, just be very sensitive to those things that are asked of us, or we are exposed to that create OUCH!.

What might some of these things be? In terms of the interaction model it will be anything that eliminates  or ignores the left facing arrow in the gesture response dynamic, anything that eliminates or ignores the bottom right arrow in the right loop ( the arrow depicting a change of intentions based on present interaction).

Interaction Model

When these two parts of the interaction model are eliminated or ignored it is the clearest sign that what you are being asked to do or being exposed to is somehow supposed to create certainty and this means OUCH! at a very real and personal level.

Some common examples of things that do this:

  • Almost anything that has a certain number of ‘steps’ that when taken are supposed to end up with some concrete result.
  • Almost anything that has a defined end point that is supposed to be reached by someone who has organizational power.
  • Almost any single learning event that is supposed to change behavior or produce a concrete result.
  • Almost any acronym that when applied is supposed to create a result of some kind (this is a variation on the first point).
  • Almost any set of behaviors that are supposed to create success of some sort.

Given the above you can see why it is good to start off being critical!

From this critical perspective you will readily see the OUCH! causing things we are all exposed to. From here it is good to then ask for evidence that any of these activities will actually do what they are espoused to do.

In my experience when you do ask for evidence there are often two common outcomes:

  1. You will be given evidence based on ‘stories’ of when these activities were done in other organizations and the result was positive. This is very common ‘evidence’ when experts are involved.
  2. Your question gets answered without evidence ever being mentioned but that it is necessary to do something and this something is good. This is very common within the power dynamics of organizational hierarchy.

You now have a choice to make since neither of the above is evidence that these activities will produce what they are supposed to do. Your choice is whether or not you want to push harder and risk entering into conflict or just leave things alone, say this is full of shit in your quiet voice and apply what was discussed in the last two posts.

In my opinion, in our given organizational environments, either choice is viable, sensible and just fine. If you do choose to push harder, you may find you end up with some very positive and powerful interactions. Personally I am finding this is occurring somewhat more often and this is certainly positive but I cannot say why this might be the case. Only you know the details of your situation and which choice would be best.

Now, if you are in a position of organizational power I do think you need to choose to push harder. I do think you need to enter into these interactions about evidence and see where they go; perhaps reducing OUCH!. Keep in mind that when you really dig into this idea of evidence, when it comes to people, you will likely not find much; remember with people it’s always an experiment! Nevertheless, there are choices to be made, things to try, things you think are better to try than others. There is your own left loop of experience and the left lops of others, along with the right loops of intentions that will inform your choices.

Being critical and asking for evidence, exposes OUCH!, after that you move forward doing the best you can, even with very little evidence that your choices will work or not. And that movement forward will be a little less burdened by the expectations of certainty.

With People, It’s Always an Experiment

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In the last post we looked at changing our perspective regarding the formal things we do in organizations. Seeing them as just one more interaction among hundreds we have day-to-day on various topics.

This post focuses on changing our perspective of the expectations we have of our interactions within our organizations, especially those formal interactions that are intended to create some kind of expected result. Things like strategy, performance, change, vision. Even things as seemingly concrete as job descriptions or performance objectives.

No matter how hard we try, and no matter how often we hear that what we do should lead to a specific, measurable and concrete result, if people are involved, every one of these things is much, much more of an experiment than a mapped out journey.

No one has yet been able to figure out how to predict human behavior past the innate, autonomous reactions related to biological certainty. There is a good, logical reason for this.

Interaction Model

As I have noted in earlier posts if we look at the top two arrows of the interaction model, each individual brings to bear on every interaction they have, the tremendous complexity of their past experience and their future intentions. Adding to this complexity is that much of this past and future complexity is not even conscious!

So in the midst of our countless interactions it is quite simply not possible to predict what responses we might receive. And the idea of prediction gets even more absurd as greater numbers of people are involved and greater numbers of interactions occur.

There is no doubt in my mind however that YOU and ME are going to be asked, expected or required to produce some kind of certainty in our organizational roles. To reduce OUCH! our small step is not to necessarily fight this expectation (although great if you can/do) but to recognize, for yourself, that this expectation is absurd, for good logical reasons.

As described in the last post everything may look just the same in your organization, but you can think about this differently. It may be quite frustrating to have this perspective but I think frustration is far better than guilt, shame or blame.

A short example and an excerpt from a blog post I wrote in 2011 about a Twitter exchange I had:

The exchange was with a very well known management guru (unless they use a ghost tweeter) who was posting about 4 steps needed to get the culture you want in your organization.  Without expecting a response and pretty much sick and tired of ‘4 steps to get anything you want’ programs I simply posted something like…”So if we follow these steps and don’t get the culture we want does that mean we’re incompetent?”  Well I actually got a response back – “Not sure about ‘incompetent,’ but yes, if you pull those 4 levers effectively you will create the culture you want.” ( see entire post here)

If I was in an organization dedicated to implementing these guru’s 4 steps, it could be pretty risky to stand up and say this guy was full of shit. Worse yet, if I believe this guy I am well on my way to being seen as incompetent or some other crappy description of my value and worth. Worse still, if I don’t recognize any of this I quite easily begin to see myself defined by those crappy descriptions.  This is the pervasive nature of OUCH!

So in a nutshell, this post is asking you to say this guy (and so many other expectations of certainty) are full of shit! Just say it in your quiet voice!

Keep in mind as you adopt this perspective that an awful lot of expectations in organizations and an awful lot of ‘experts’ are full of shit! You may find this silent mantra becomes highly repetitive for you. OUCH! may very well be replaced by high levels of frustration and a creeping feeling that all this formal organization stuff is quite possibly not just absurd, but mostly meaningless as well.

When you get to that point you will perhaps smile….

 

The Formal Stuff Matters, But Not Much

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One of the quickest ways to remove some OUCH! from our work environments is to change our perspective on the formal things we do in our work environments. Everything else can look and be exactly the same; everyone else can have lots of OUCH! in the same scenario but you don’t need too.

This is not some magic answer, or some contradiction to most of what I have been writing about for months! It is simply a logical and rational way to think about those formal things we do in organizations. Things like our roles in performance management systems, strategy sessions, learning and team building events, budgeting sessions, sales projection meetings, communication strategy development, change management planning….. and add your own.

Of course these things matter, but not that much. The logical and practical reason for this is that the FORMAL interactions we have in these areas are numerically tiny compared to the number of day-to-day interactions we have about these same topics. The FORMAL interactions are just one or perhaps a few of countless interactions we have in these areas (see this post)!

So the best way to get some OUCH! out of these formal things is to think about them as simply one more interaction about an area of focus that it is important.

There is simply no need to get all hyped up and stressed out about having a huge impact in a performance management meeting, or a strategic planning session. These meetings are nothing more than a different context for interaction! Mathematically they have a much smaller chance of making any difference than your day-to-day interactions about the same thing.

The best way to help yourself think this way is to recognize all those day-to-day interactions that you do have on these topics. What do your performance interactions look like day-to-day; your strategy interactions; those about change? When you recognize these interactions, stepping into the formal context is simply a continuation of existing patterns of interaction. In fact, when you look at these formal things in this way, you can look at these formal interactions as another valuable context, one perhaps more focused and direct than those day-to-day ones. They do not have to be loaded with false expectations however, and it is this that removes so much OUCH!

Now, if you try to recognize day-to-day interactions about a specific area of focus, let’s say performance, and can’t think of any, you are either in denial or in trouble, and 95% of the time its denial; just look honestly harder and you will find them. If it is the 5% at play, you are in trouble since you are not interacting with people nearly enough about these important areas of focus in your organization.

Strategy, performance, learning, change, communication ARE important! It’s just the formal processes we inflict on ourselves to deal with them that are not!

So give it a try:

  • Think about an important area of focus
  • Recognize the day-to-day ways that you interact with others regarding that area of focus (you should be able to recognize lots!)
  • Think about your next formal interaction about this area of focus and see it as simply one more interaction
  • Reflect on how this ‘feels’
  • Act on that feeling when it comes time for that formal interaction

You may notice a reduction in OUCH! (as explained in this post). You may also notice an increase in your discomfort with your day-to-day interactions in these areas of focus. You may also notice that the reasons the formal things are important in your organization have nothing to do with that actual thing! They are just means of social control and a misguided sense of understanding organizations. Reducing OUCH! doesn’t necessarily make things wonderful. It just means you probably have more important and realistic things to think about and act on. It means there is a better fit between your experience of being in your organization and how you understand your organization.

If we are going to be concerned, let’s be concerned and focus on things that actually matter. The above may help you do that….

Small Steps; Ebb and Flow

20151104_145345‘… in the course of history, a change in human behaviour in the direction of civilization gradually emerged from the ebb and flow of events. Every small step on this path was determined by the wishes and plans of individual people and groups; but what has grown up on this path up to now, our standard of behaviour and our psychological make-up, was certainly not intended by individual people. And it is in this way that human society moves forward as a whole; in this way the whole history of mankind has run its course.’  (The Society of Individuals – pages 63 – 64).

I think this quote used earlier from Norbert Elias is a good place to start as we look at what small steps we can take to reduce the OUCH! we now experience in organizations. It is also a good reminder of the ebb and flow of things.  Most of the formal things we do in organizations, so many of those things causing OUCH! came about like many of the things that supported our drive for certainty as we came to live in larger and larger groups. Not much initial thought or planning, not much consideration that these things were even involved in a drive for certainty. Just things that emerged through our countless interactions in organizations that we thought might help organizations succeed.

If we follow this line of reasoning we would expect that many of these formal things will eventually disappear and be replaced by potentially more effective ‘things’. Indeed, there already is a lot of noise about replacing or abandoning performance management systems.

So why not just wait it out and all this OUCH! soon will pass?

Well that would be like deciding not to take any small steps at all! And even if those small steps cannot predict what might grow up on our pathways, they do hold the potential of contribution. As well, OUCH! creates a lot of shame, blame and guilt and we can take our own small steps, planned steps to reduce this OUCH! in our own experience and perhaps for some of those that we interact with on a regular basis in our organizations.

Even though as individuals we may be very tiny parts of the very large ebb and flow of organizational life we do not have to tolerate the very large amounts of OUCH!, the very large disconnect between mainstream understanding of organizations and our actual experience. And who knows, perhaps some of our small steps may have a large impact!

We will be looking at these small steps within the context of our direct and actual day to day experiences. Things we can try in our day to day interactions that have the potential of reducing OUCH! We will also be using the interaction model.

We will be focusing on the following:

  • The formal stuff matters, but not much
  • With people, it’s always an experiment
  • Reflect on power
  • Be critical and ask for evidence

As we go through these areas perhaps some others will emerge but for now, this is where we will start; considering our own small steps.