Reflect on Power

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The last three posts have looked at ways of taking our own small steps in reducing OUCH! in our organizational lives. This post continues by looking at something that is best ignored if you are trying to convince someone, or believe that you can design certainty. That something is power.

Power is present in every second of our lives and yet overall it is rarely dealt with in mainstream understanding of organizations. The reason power is best ignored in mainstream understanding of organizations is that it is the primary thing that throws a wrench into this idea of creating certainty. Power, in a very fundamental way is the most significant output of our gestures and responses, the actual way the interaction model plays out in our day to day lives.

Interaction Model

There are almost endless ways of considering and understanding power and the processes in which it affects us. Within the interaction model power can be considered fairly simply. The way we use power is identified in the gestures we use and the way we are affected by power is the way it affects our responses. The dynamic of power is the interplay between gestures and responses in any given interaction.

For example if you are reading this, you are reading my gesture. That gesture has a certain power in that it is affecting your responses such as taking up your time, perhaps influencing your thinking, perhaps helping you to sleep! You may respond back to me with a comment and it would be your specific response that I would respond to that would identify the ongoing dynamic of power emerging between us.

As you can see power is at play all the time, and it is at play primarily and most practically through our ongoing gestures and responses.

There are two important reasons to reflect on power in an effort to reduce OUCH! in our organizational experience:

  1. Power is often ignored in mainstream understanding of organizations.
  2. Understanding how power plays out for us as individuals gives us the potential for more considered gestures and responses.

In the last post I said once you have asked for evidence (and typically do not get any) regarding something you are being asked to do producing the result espoused, that you have a choice; keep pushing or not. This is a recognition of the real and important power that will be at play in your specific situation.

Most mainstream approaches to situations like this will ignore this power and you will be given the ‘tools’ or the impression (subtle or not) that you should keep pushing! After all, only by ‘keeping pushing’ could you create the certain result you want! Well, the power at play in these situations is the most real and important thing happening! Much more important than any tool or impression. And that power can negate any plan for certainty! It should not be ignored to any degree!

When you do not ignore power you have the opportunity to consider the most important dynamic happening between people in organizations; how power is affecting the gestures and responses of people as they move along in their day to day organizational lives.

From here you can reflect on your own gestures and responses, and those of others and consider them; ask why they are what they are, ask if perhaps they can be different, how you might alter your gestures and responses to affect change. You can consider yourself and those around you in a much more practical way, one that may be very difficult but also has less OUCH!

I encourage you over the next while to really reflect on the power at play in your work environment. Consider how your power shapes your gestures, how you respond to the power in the gestures of others and how the dynamic of power has both patterns and uniqueness for you.

You may find that you begin to understand you, and your work experience quite differently.

 

 

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